Oliver Sin | contemporary painter | science
science art, math art, science painting, mathematics paintiang, mathematics art, art about science
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science Tag

03 Oct Iceland’s volcano

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar.

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts.

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen.

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paul erdos

08 Jun Math Art | Conjecture On Arithmetic Progression With Paul Erdos

Math art with mathematician Paul Erdos. acrylic and oil pastel, spray on canvas, 110X160cm

 

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radushkevich & lukyanovich 1952 nanotube with sumio iijima part by oliver sin

20 Aug Science Art | Nanotube with Radushkevich & Lukyanovich in 1952 With Sumio Iijima

science art | acrylic, oil pastel on paper, 50X70cm

 

In 1952 a paper describing hollow graphitic carbon fibers appeared in the Soviet Journal of Physical Chemistry. The authors were Radushkevich and Lukyanovich.  Since then many scientists discusses similar growths of carbon fibers, but not until 1991 did it get into focus of thorough researches, when the Japanese Sumio Iijama “discovered” carbon nanotubes.  Carbon nanotubes are fullerenes: such entirely carbon-consisted molecules, which are hollow and take the shape of a sphere, ellipsoid or tube. Nanotubes have a long, hollow structure with walls of only one-atom-thick sheets of carbon. How these sheets are rolled at specific angles decide the main properties of the nanotubes, like whether it will be a metal or semiconductor. They can be single-walled (consisting of only one graphene sheet) or multi-walled. Carbon nanotubes have some very interesting properties. As already said, depending on their structures they can be metallic or semiconducting. They are very strong, have a high tensile strength, keep stability on high temperatures, and have a low density (1.3-1.4 g/cm3). Because of these properties it has a great potential in applications. Bulk nanotubes (unorganized fragments of nanotubes) are already used in polymers to improve their thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Hybtonite carbon nanoepoxy is used for sports gear, wind turbines, and marine paints.

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planetary resources - science art

09 Aug Science Art | Planetary Resources Inc

science art | acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 110X160cm

Planetary Resources Inc The Asteroid Mining Company by Oliver Sin

I made this science art picture about the Planetary Resources Inc. It’s company who started a revolution in the field asteroid mining. This alliance between scientists and billionaires will change the political construction of our society, because they will possess more resources from the space, than all other firms or governments can have in the next hundred years.

Space mining, asteroid mining – may sound even familiar, provided you know E.E. Smith’s Lensman series. Well, science-fiction may become real, as Planetary Resources announced that it’s going to mine outa space, so to say.

And why would they do that? Well, most of the precious metals and minerals on Earth derive from asteroid impacts, not to mention that their concentration in asteroids can be multiple hundred times higher than here on Earth. Modern technology and luxury craft uses gold, platinum, rhodium, iridium, ruthenium, and osmium – all which are rare and expensive. But what if we had a near infinite supply of them?

Yet, even of a greater value is the water these asteroids may contain. As boosting water into the space is very costly, it would reduce the cost of space missions by a lot if there was a space water-source. And from that water even hydrogen could be made, which is one component of the rocket fuel (the other is oxygen). So mining asteroids seems absolutely reasonable.

And that is what Planetary Resources thinks too. First they try to find the richest asteroids for mining with their Arkyd-100 space telescopes. Then, the promising candidates are examined by the Arkyd-200s. The swarm of Arkyd-300 series will finalize the selection taking complementary measurements. After that, the mining process can start. How? Well, it still needs some further research, but it is surely worth the efforts.

Planetary Resources Inc. with the staff: Eric Anderson, Peter H. Diamandis, Chris Lewicki, Chris Voorhees, James Cameron, Thomas D. Jones, General T. Michael Moseley, Sara Seager, Mark V. Sykes, David Vaskevitch, John K. Villa, John S. Lewis, Eric E. Schmidt, K. Ram Shriram, Charles Simonyi, Larry Page, Ross Perot.

10th March 2027

acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 110X160cm

 

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math art -science art

07 Aug Math Art | Green-Tao Theorem with Endre Szemerédi

Science art , math art, acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 110X160cm

Ben Joseph Green is a British mathematician, interested in number theory and combinatorics, having published several results in both fields. Terence Chu-Shen Tao is an Australian mathematician working in random, matrix theory,  analytic number theory, combinatorics, and some other fields of mathematics.  In 2004 the two mathematicians solved an old conjecture according to which the sequence of prime numbers contains arbitrary long arithmetic progressions. (That is: we can always find somewhere in the infinity of integers a progression of prime numbers of any length with equal spacing – like 3, 7, and 11, which is a progression of primes with 4 spacing, and it is a 3 number progression as the next number, 15, is not a prime.) This theory is called the Green-Tao theorem, which is an extension of Szemerédi’s theorem (in 1975 Endre Szemerédi solved the Erdős-Turán conjecture for the general k).

Entered in the 1st MODESSQE International painting contests in Poland. Received a distiction making it a part of their”Perfectionists” main collection.

Modessqe 1st International Painting Contest organised at Skwer “Fabryka Trzciny Art Center”, Warsaw, Poland.

Oliver Sin is exhibiting at the Modessqe 1st International Painting Contest organized at Skwer – a branch of the Fabryka Trzciny Art Center, Warsaw, Poland.The topic of the first edition of the Contest is “Perfectionists”.The awards include the royalty fee: Grand Prix – €3500, €1600 – for the second place, €1200 – for the third place and 5 x €700 – for Honourable Mentions and Distinctions.Full list of artist: Arkadiusz Andrejkow, Katarina Balunova, Natalia Bazowska, Grzegorz Bozek, Monika Chlebek, Piotr Kmita, Bartosz Kokosinski, Piotr Korzeniowski, Agata Kus, Paraic Leahy, Jakub Laczny, Pawel Matyszewski, Anita Mikas, Marta Nadolle, Lukasz Patelczyk, Oliver Sin, Seweryn Swacha, Sebastian Sleczka, Marta Tomasik, Artur Trojanowski, Jane Walker. The Award Ceremony will be held on the 6th of September 2013.

www.modessqe.com

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universe part 2 by Oliver Sin

19 Jun Science Art | Universe

science art | acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 80X120cm

Baroque ant eats bible. Art. Isn’t it?

When I’ve started high school (Miklós Radnóti High School, Dunakeszi) my father had that crazy idea to move to Göd-Újtelep. I don’t know anything about that place now, but back in 1999 it was a god-forgotten, dirty village. It was only renowned by its asylum for children. My school was to far, so I hadn’t got anything to have fun with. I was so bored, that one afternoon had that crazy idea to make an art collaboration with some kind of animals (too much spare time). Of course, our house had a big garden with some bushes, so my head started working.  Not much later I’ve found a little anthill under of these weed. I went back to the house, got some food from the kitchen and started painting on my biggest paper on the floor. With the food. I used some chicken, cereals, honey and everything I could find in the fridge. After I’ve finished I’ve put the whole stuff on the top of that anthill. In the next two week the ants started eatings and have finished the artwork.

This was my first performance I think and the inspiration for one of my favorite science art painting, Universe.

date: 27th August 2043

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science art guitar

18 Jun Math Art | Evolution Of Stanislav Smirnov On Guitar

Rockstars and mathematicians are the same. They deserve fame, glory and electric guitars. Smirnov mostly plays in the genres of complex analysis, dynamical systems and probability theory.

math art | acrylics on guitar

 

Stanislav Smirnov is a Russian mathematician, mostly known of his percolation theory. Percolation theory describes the relation and behaviour of connected clusters in a random graph, a randomly generated abstract representation of vertices (a set of objects) with edges (links exist between some pairs of the objects). The theory’s name comes from its representative question, which is the following. Assuming that some liquid is poured on top of some porous material, will it be able to make its way from hole to hole and reach bottom? Another model for it is like this: if we immerse a porous stone into water what is the probability of the centre of the stone getting wet? The question was introduced by Broadbent & Hammersley in 1957.

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max planck oliver sin macro

17 Jun Science Art | Quantum Theory On Boots With Max Planck

 

science art | acrylics on boots

Quantum mechanics is a descriptive branch of physics dealing with the atomic and subatomic world, giving explanation of the dual particle-like and wave-like behaviour of energy and matter. Max Planck, a German theoretical physicist, is considered father or the Quantum Theory. Planck (April 23, 1858 – October 4, 1947) started to deal with the black-body radiation problem in the 1890’s. In 1859 Gustav Kirchoff raised the question “how does the intensity of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by a black body depend on the frequency of the radiation and the temperature of the body?” Planck’s answer was that energy can only be radiated and absorbed in discrete amounts called “quantas”, or E = hν where h is the Planck’s constant and ν is the frequency of the radiation. Planck’s quantum hypothesis was used later by Albert Einstein to explain the photoelectric effect.

FN5 pályázatok kiállítása

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